Places‎ > ‎Warren Nature Area - WNA‎ > ‎

WNA Maintenance

About WNA Habitat Maintenance

This is a list of maintenance tasks & improvements for the Warren Nature Area and surrounding areas.
  • Park Wide Improvements
    • Stop planting exotic trees & shrubs
    • Remove all invasive exotic trees; and replace with native fruit bearing trees
    • End dumping of soil & rubble
    • Pickup litter
  • Grassland Improvements
    • Prescribed burning of grasslands
    • Removal of invading trees & shrubs
    • Mowing shrubs to control their growth
    • Replacing smooth brome and fescue grasses with native grasses and forbs (wildflowers)
    • Maintaining & monitoring bluebird houses
  • Wetland Improvements
    • Removing invading trees
    • Controlling cat-tails
    • Controlling Japanese honeysuckle
    • Controlling Amur maple
  • Woodland Improvements
    • Controlling Amur honeysuckle
    • Controlling winter creeper
    • Controlling Japanese honeysuckle
    • Trash pickup along woodland trail
    • Remove old contstruction rubble
  • Shunga Creek Improvements
    • Clean out junk dumped in and along the creek 

Westar Green Team Projects for 2012

  • Add a foot bridge to regain access to Wells Park from Gage Boulevard.
  • Remove Amur maple and other trees from the west end of the wetlands, leave cottonwoods and willows.
  • Cut remaining trees in brome/fescue fields
  • Plant native grasses in brome/fescue fields
  • Add "lock box" to wetland drainage box to prevent people from tampering with drain.

Brush Clearing

Small trees & shrubs shall be cleared from the grassland areas south of KNI's campus as well as in the woods along Shunga Creek.  Brush in the grassland is being cleared to prepare the sites for seeding with native grasses and forbs.

Invasive Alien Plants

Invasive alien species of woody plants include the following species.  The goal is to eliminate these plants from all parts of the nature area.

Grassland Invaders

Some native shrubs can become invasive in a grassland.  They are controlled by mowing and burning.  Some of these plants are desirable as "edge" habitat, but they must be controlled in a grassland. They include the following species.  They do provide important habitat for wildlife in the transition zone between grasslands and woodlands.

Spring 2011 Wildflower Seeding

TAS used a grant from the National Audubon Society to purchase native prairie wildflower seeds.  These seeds were planted on the north side of the Shunga trail.  The City of Topeka prepared the area for planting by removing woody plants and eliminating cool season grasses.  The following perennial flowers were seeded.  It will take a few years before the plants are mature enough to produce flowers.

  • wild bergamot (Monarda fistulosa)
  • ox-eye sunflower (Heliopsis helianthoides)
  • foxglove beard tongue (Penstemon digitalis)
  • compass plant (Silphium lanciniatum)
  • prairie blazing star (Liatris pycnostachya)
  • sky blue aster (Symphyotrichum oolentangiensis)

Bush Honeysuckle Removal

Bush honeysuckle has invaded all of the woodlands along Shunga Creek. The bush honeysuckle is Amur honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii). Every fall in November, volunteers from the TAS & Kansas Native Plant Society cut and treated with herbicide the bush honeysuckle.  It is a very invasive species in Kansas.  It replaces native vegetation and reduces habitat for wildlife.
The Parks Department uses a brush hog to clear honeysuckle in the woods as well.  This occurs during summer.

Prairie Seeding

Every October, volunteers of TAS & other organizations collected seed from the Grant-Bradbury native prairie park to be used to restore an area of the park. The park manager for the city, mowed, sprayed and removed trees from the area to be seeded. Volunteers from TAS spread the seed in December each year.

TAS Volunteers collect prairie seed

In October, 2010, volunteers of TAS & other organizations collected seed from the Grant-Bradbury native prairie park to be used to restore an area of the park. The park manager for the city, mowed, sprayed and removed trees from the area to be seeded. Volunteers from TAS spread the seed in November of 2010.
TAS was awarded a grant of $200 from National Audubon Society to purchase native grass & forb seed to restore more areas to native grassland.

Native Grass Seeding

Furthermore, native grasses shall be seeded using a native grass drill. Native grasses that are seeded include the following.
  • Switchgrass
  • Indian grass
  • Big bluestem
  • Little bluestem
  • Side-oats grama
  • Eastern gama
  • Canada wildrye 
Comments